Tag: stone

Milford

Both on the way and returning from our most recent trip to Pennsylvania, we stopped at Milford, PA. Milford is the county seat of Pike County and is near where Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey border each other. Below are some images of historic structures in town. I used the map on the historical plaque above to guide me through the Milford Historic District. Click on the links to visit sites that have more info about the individual structures in Milford‘s downtown. And note that we visited on a very overcast day. We also drove up the road from downtown to Grey Towers, the home of Gifford Pinchot. It was too late to take a tour of the house, but it would be a good place to visit in the future. By the way, did you know that Pinchot was born in a house in Simsbury, CT? You can read about that house over at Historic Buildings of Connecticut.

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Hans Herr House (1719)

Hans Herr House

Leaving State College, our destination was Lancaster County, PA. This is the heart of what is called the Pennsylvania Dutch (really Pennsylvania German) country. I visited four historic sites in the area over two days. On our first day in the area, I visited the Hans Herr House (1719), 1849 Hans Herr Dr, Willow Street, PA. This is the oldest surviving house in Lancaster County. Built by Mennonite settlers as a home and a meeting house, it is now a museum owned by the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. The house is small, but very impressive because it really has a medieval look. The house is made of stone and with its irregular placement of windows, it is quite a contrast with the types of houses I’m used to in New England. That is the great thing, for those interested in old buildings, about traveling to a region like Lancaster County, where the early settlers were not all English and had a quite different building tradition. In addition to the Hans Herr House, the property has has two later farmhouses, built by Herr descendants (one of which has the visitor center, the other is a private home), a reconstructed blacksmith shop and barn, and a barn with a large display of farm implements. Adjacent to the house, there is also an herb garden. › Continue reading…

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Graeme Park (1722)

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After visiting Hope Lodge, it was a brief trip over to Graeme Park, in Horsham in Montgomery County, PA. The blur in the picture above is not a ghost. Instead, I blurred our tour guide for the sake of privacy! This historic home was built in 1722 for William Keith, who was colonial Deputy Governor of Pennsylvania (for the then absent Penn family) from 1717 to 1726. The house, which was later named Graeme Park for Dr. Thomas Graeme, is a beautiful stone structure with striking blue trim. As for the interior, the rooms are mostly empty with just a few items of furniture, so the emphasis is on the paneling of this distinctive home. › Continue reading…

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