Archive for 'Pennsylvania'

Boalsburg Tavern (1819)

Boalsburg Tavern

Back in 2009, when I visited the Boal Mansion and Columbus Chapel in Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, we drove by an old Georgian-style stone building called Duffy’s Boalsburg Tavern. Looking it up now, I discover it was built in 1819 and was first owned by Col. James Johnson. It operated continuously until the building was damaged by fire in 1934. Within three years, it was restored and reopened. Harry Duffy purchased it 1946. He named it Duffy’s Tavern and ran it until his death in 1961. It is part of the Boalsburg Historic District and is included in the Historic American Buildings Survey.

I’ve written before about my recent visit to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, where there are many surviving colonial structures built by the Moravians. Adjacent to these structures is an area by Monocacy Creek (Flooding is a problem!) called the Colonial Industrial Quarter, where the industrious Moravians practiced a variety of trades. Some of these industrial buildings are in ruins, but others survive. The entire complex is now part of the Historic Bethlehem Partnership and is worth visiting. Click below for pics and info on some of the buildings. › Continue reading…

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After visiting Trout Hall in Allentown, we drove out to Egypt, PA to see the Troxell-Steckel House, which is also owned by the Lehigh County Historical Society. In contrast to the English Georgian style of Trout Hall, the Troxell-Steckel House is a German farmhouse, built in 1756 by John Peter Troxell, who sold it to Peter Steckel in 1768. The property also includes a barn with a display of farming equipment. › Continue reading…

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On my recent trip to Pennsylvania, I also visited two sites in the Allentown area. The first was Trout Hall, the city’s oldest house, built in 1770 as a summer home for James Allen, son of Allentown’s founder, William Allen. Allen was a loyalist during the Revolutionary War, which led to a lot of trouble for him, as you can imagine. There’s a pdf document online with more info about the house. On the tour, visitors can hear all about Allen and his travails and also visit the modern Lehigh County Historical Society museum next door. The house had to be restored because it was later part of Muhlenberg College and got attached to other structures that were later demolished. › Continue reading…

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During my recent trip to Pennsylvania, I also stopped by the city of Bethlehem, famous for industry. Bethlehem was founded by the Moravians in 1741. The historic downtown has many Germanic-style colonial buildings erected by the Moravian Church, as well as later historic structures. The Moravians originally lived communally, in separate buildings designated for different “choirs” divided by sex and marital status. The area is still home to the Central Moravian Church and Moravian College. Some books on the subject include: Historical sketch of Bethlehem in Pennsylvania, with Some Account of the Moravian Church (1873), by John Hill Martin; A History of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1741-1892 (1903), by Joseph Mortimer Levering; and Historical Notes on Music in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, from 1741 to 1871 (1873), by Rufus A. Grider › Continue reading…

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On my most recent trip to Pennsylvania, I visited several historic places, including the town of Jim Thorpe. Originally called Mauch Chunk, the borough became a railroad and coal-shipping center in the nineteenth century and is notable for its many Victorian-era buildings. The boroughs of Mauch Chunk and East Mauch Chunk merged in 1953, hoping top attract tourism by taking the name of the Olympic athlete Jim Thorpe. I toured the Asa Packer Mansion and took pictures in town. › Continue reading…

St. Michael the Archangel Orthodox Church (1932), N Nicholas St.

My great-grandparents came from the Carpatho-Rusyn area of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (now in Ukraine) and came to St Clair, Pennsylvania. Carpatho-Rusyns are generally Eastern Catholics whose churches use the Byzantine Rite. Yesterday, I took pictures of five Byzantine Rite parish churches in St Clair. Some of these are Eastern Orthodox churches and others are Greek Catholic churches.

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