Archive for 'New York'

Houses on Union Street, Hudson NY

After visiting Olana and Cedar Grove, I took some pictures in the city of Hudson, NY. Warren Street in Hudson is famous for its Victorian architecture, but Union Street (which is parallel to Warren to the south) has many nineteenth-century houses. The house in the picture above is the c. 1850 Terry-Gillette Mansion at 601 Union Street, designed by Richard Upjohn. Below are some more of the interesting houses with approximate dates of construction. › Continue reading…

Cedar Grove (1815)

After visiting Olana, it was a quick trip across the Hudson River to Cedar Grove, the Thomas Cole National Historic Site, in Catskill, New York. Built in 1815 by the Thomson family, the house was later the home of painter Thomas Cole, who married a niece of the owner, a local merchant named John A. Thomson, in 1836. Cole is regarded as the founder of the Hudson River School of landscape painting. Frederic Edwin Church, who would later build Olana, was a student of Cole at Cedar Grove. The Greene County Historical Society purchased the property in 1998 and it has been open as a house museum since 2001. › Continue reading…

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Olana (1872)

Last Friday, I visited Olana for the first time. The orientalizing “Persian”-style home of Hudson River School landscape painter Frederic Edwin Church, Olana is located on a hill (surrounded by an extensive property) in Hudson, New York. Church, aided by architect Calvert Vaux, constructed Olana between 1870 and 1872. He added a studio wing to the house over the period 1888–1891. The house has been a New York State Historic Site since 1966. › Continue reading…

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New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden

A few years ago I visited the New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden, which is part of the Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Garden on New York City’s Staten Island. It is a fairly recent New York attraction, having opened in 1999. It was constructed by Chinese artists and artisans from Suzhou, which is renowned for its classical Chinese Gardens. Pictured above is the Tea House of Hearing Pines. See below for more pictures. › Continue reading…

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Three Historic Houses in Brooklyn

In addition to he Wyckoff House, I also saw three other early historic houses in Park Slope, Brooklyn. The Lefferts House (above) was closed, so I didn’t go inside. The house was built in 1783 and was the former home of Continental Army Lieutenant Pieter Lefferts. In 1918, it was moved six blocks to Prospect Park, where it is now a children’s museum. › Continue reading…

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Wyckoff House (1652)

On my most recent trip to Brooklyn, I visited the Wyckoff Farmhouse, at 5816 Clarendon Road. Less than a century ago, this house was surrounded by farm fields and there were other Dutch colonial farm houses nearby. The Wyckoff House, isolated in Milton Fidler Park, now is surrounded by twentieth-century development. The oldest section of the house (on the right, in the image above) dates to 1652. Other rooms were added in the eighteenth and the first half of the nineenth century. › Continue reading…

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I’m getting ready for a trip to Brooklyn later today and I’m reminded of some previous visits there. I won’t be going to the neighborhood of Brooklyn Heights this time, but I’ve stopped by there before to see Plymouth Church (designed by J.C. Wells and built in 1849-1850, the church is now called Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, ever since Plymouth Church and the Church of the Pilgrims merged). Plymouth Church, a congregational church at 25 Hicks Street at Orange Street, is historically significant for its association with the famous nineteenth-century minister Henry Ward Beecher. Abolitionist, brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe and infamous due to the Beecher-Tilton scandal, Henry Ward Beecher was a fascinating figure. On my first visit to Brooklyn Heights, I took some pics of the church’s exterior. On a later visit I got to go inside the church. › Continue reading…

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