Archive for 'Italianate'

Houses on Union Street, Hudson NY

After visiting Olana and Cedar Grove, I took some pictures in the city of Hudson, NY. Warren Street in Hudson is famous for its Victorian architecture, but Union Street (which is parallel to Warren to the south) has many nineteenth-century houses. The house in the picture above is the c. 1850 Terry-Gillette Mansion at 601 Union Street, designed by Richard Upjohn. Below are some more of the interesting houses with approximate dates of construction. › Continue reading…

Three Historic Houses in Brooklyn

In addition to he Wyckoff House, I also saw three other early historic houses in Park Slope, Brooklyn. The Lefferts House (above) was closed, so I didn’t go inside. The house was built in 1783 and was the former home of Continental Army Lieutenant Pieter Lefferts. In 1918, it was moved six blocks to Prospect Park, where it is now a children’s museum. › Continue reading…

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I’m getting ready for a trip to Brooklyn later today and I’m reminded of some previous visits there. I won’t be going to the neighborhood of Brooklyn Heights this time, but I’ve stopped by there before to see Plymouth Church (designed by J.C. Wells and built in 1849-1850, the church is now called Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims, ever since Plymouth Church and the Church of the Pilgrims merged). Plymouth Church, a congregational church at 25 Hicks Street at Orange Street, is historically significant for its association with the famous nineteenth-century minister Henry Ward Beecher. Abolitionist, brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe and infamous due to the Beecher-Tilton scandal, Henry Ward Beecher was a fascinating figure. On my first visit to Brooklyn Heights, I took some pics of the church’s exterior. On a later visit I got to go inside the church. › Continue reading…

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During my recent trip to Pennsylvania, I also stopped by the city of Bethlehem, famous for industry. Bethlehem was founded by the Moravians in 1741. The historic downtown has many Germanic-style colonial buildings erected by the Moravian Church, as well as later historic structures. The Moravians originally lived communally, in separate buildings designated for different “choirs” divided by sex and marital status. The area is still home to the Central Moravian Church and Moravian College. Some books on the subject include: Historical sketch of Bethlehem in Pennsylvania, with Some Account of the Moravian Church (1873), by John Hill Martin; A History of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1741-1892 (1903), by Joseph Mortimer Levering; and Historical Notes on Music in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, from 1741 to 1871 (1873), by Rufus A. Grider › Continue reading…

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On my most recent trip to Pennsylvania, I visited several historic places, including the town of Jim Thorpe. Originally called Mauch Chunk, the borough became a railroad and coal-shipping center in the nineteenth century and is notable for its many Victorian-era buildings. The boroughs of Mauch Chunk and East Mauch Chunk merged in 1953, hoping top attract tourism by taking the name of the Olympic athlete Jim Thorpe. I toured the Asa Packer Mansion and took pictures in town. › Continue reading…

Milford

Both on the way and returning from our most recent trip to Pennsylvania, we stopped at Milford, PA. Milford is the county seat of Pike County and is near where Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey border each other. Below are some images of historic structures in town. I used the map on the historical plaque above to guide me through the Milford Historic District. Click on the links to visit sites that have more info about the individual structures in Milford‘s downtown. And note that we visited on a very overcast day. We also drove up the road from downtown to Grey Towers, the home of Gifford Pinchot. It was too late to take a tour of the house, but it would be a good place to visit in the future. By the way, did you know that Pinchot was born in a house in Simsbury, CT? You can read about that house over at Historic Buildings of Connecticut.

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